View photo
  • 5 days ago
  • 2751
View photo
  • 5 days ago
  • 24407
View photo
  • 6 days ago
  • 734
View photo
  • 2 weeks ago
  • 98054
View photo
  • 3 weeks ago
  • 1
View photo
  • 3 weeks ago
  • 253898
View photo
  • 3 weeks ago
  • 943
View photo
  • 3 weeks ago
  • 1

Wicked Problems and the Relationship Triad

tirwin1954:

A paper which connects wicked design problems to chaos and complexity theories and proposes a simple framework for how to design for them.

View text
  • 3 weeks ago
  • 2

The Inconquerability Of Wicked Problems

Atul Gawande recalls the work of social scientists Horst Rittel and Melvin Webber from 1973, in a passage worth quoting at length:

[Rittel and Webber] defined a class of problems they called “wicked problems.” Wicked problems are messy, ill-defined, more complex than we fully grasp, and open to multiple interpretations based on one’s point of view. They are problems such as poverty, obesity, where to put a new highway—or how to make sure that people have adequate health care.
They are the opposite of “tame problems,” which can be crisply defined, completely understood, and fixed through technical solutions. Tame problems are not necessarily simple—they include putting a man on the moon or devising a cure for diabetes. They are, however, solvable. Solutions to tame problems either work or they don’t.
Solutions to wicked problems, by contrast, are only better or worse. Trade-offs are unavoidable. Unanticipated complications and benefits are both common. And opportunities to learn by trial and error are limited. You can’t try a new highway over here and over there; you put it where you put it. But new issues will arise. Adjustments will be required. No solution to a wicked problem is ever permanent or wholly satisfying, which leaves every solution open to easy polemical attack

View text
  • 3 weeks ago
View photo
  • 3 weeks ago
  • 57
x